[at-l] Snowshoes?

Mara Factor mfactor at gmail.com
Wed Dec 22 20:05:33 CST 2010


Hi all,

Check out my page on snowshoes at
http://friends.backcountry.net/m_factor/snowshoes.html .

It discusses everything from flotation to snow type to field repairability,
and more.

I wrote it a few years ago so there are probably changes to the specific
models referenced but the rest all holds.

Mara
Stitches, AT99

Visit my Travels and Trails web site at:
http://friends.backcountry.net/m_factor


On Wed, Dec 22, 2010 at 8:40 PM, Frank Looper <nightwalker.at at gmail.com>wrote:

> http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=190355274970
>
>
> On Wed, Dec 22, 2010 at 8:18 PM, Tom McGinnis <sloetoe at yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Well, I post-holed the Nantahalas in "the usual" 48 hours, crashing the
>> downhills with 6' footsteps (that was *awesome*), and just taking my time on
>> the uphills (a zen, slow-it-down-there-brother exercise, to be sure). If a
>> shoe is really needed, it seems like LeeIJoe's thoughts are spot on..... (My
>> vote, any whey.)
>>
>> sneauxtoe
>>
>> --- On *Wed, 12/22/10, Frank Looper <nightwalker.at at gmail.com>* wrote:
>>
>>
>> From: Frank Looper <nightwalker.at at gmail.com>
>> Subject: Re: [at-l] Snowshoes?
>> To: "Tom McGinnis" <sloetoe at yahoo.com>
>> Cc: l.clayton.parker at gmail.com, "at-l" <AT-L at backcountry.net>
>> Date: Wednesday, December 22, 2010, 8:08 PM
>>
>>
>> Not moving. Backpacking AT in January. Terribly snowy Winter in the South
>> this year. Like last year. Maybe more.
>>
>> Heck, we're even having a white Christmas!
>>
>> I expect deep snow in the Smokies.
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Dec 22, 2010 at 6:55 PM, Tom McGinnis <sloetoe at yahoo.com<http://mc/compose?to=sloetoe@yahoo.com>
>> > wrote:
>>
>> That first question is a biggie, there, Frankenshoen. Shoes for down
>> south?!? For *powder*?!? The last time I was able to do Fontana Dam to
>> Springer, I started out wading drifts of oatmeal snow up to my hips, and
>> finished in shirtsleeves on Springer. When I lived in New England, I made
>> neoprene-decked jobs (they're right inside, and despite lots of Wisconsin
>> use, look new at 30 years old)  You planning on a move soon?
>>
>>
>> --- On *Wed, 12/22/10, L. Clayton Parker <l.clayton.parker at gmail.com<http://mc/compose?to=l.clayton.parker@gmail.com>
>> >* wrote:
>>
>> It would help if you told us your intended usage. Packed vs. loose powder,
>> trail vs, backcountry; walking, hiking, running, etc.
>>
>> That said modern snowshoes fall into four broad categories, Mountain
>> Hiking, Backcountry, Trail Walking and Speed. Classic metal and older wood
>> framed snowshoes fall in the first two categories while plastic and
>> composite framed snowshoes can be found in all four categories. Almost all
>> snowshoes (with one exception) include some sort of built-in cleat similar
>> to a crampon. The sole exception is made to wear with regular crampons.
>>
>> Classic snowshoes are typically a bit heavier, more rugged, provide
>> greater flotation and are usually more expensive.
>>
>> Plastic and composite snowshoes are smaller, lighter, less tiring to use
>> and generally much less durable. Some trail runners cost more than classic
>> snowshoes (isn't carbon fiber wonderful?), but in general they are usually
>> cheaper.
>>
>> I own a pair of Atlas Backcountry 33s made to integrate with Black Diamond
>> Sabretooth crampons. They no longer make them but you might find a pair on
>> eBay. They are for serious winter mountaineers, not for casual backpacking
>> and camping. Atlas snowshoes can be viewed at
>> http://atlassnowshoe.com/snowshoes . At the other end of the spectrum are
>> offerings from MSR  http://cascadedesigns.com/msr/snowshoes/category .
>> These are good choices for the average backpacker who is going to be mostly
>> on trails.
>>
>> That said, even the classic snowshoes can be overwhelmed in deep enough
>> loose powder. If you look through the sites, you will see that the largest
>> shoes are in the 24 inch range, I have postholed with the Atlas 33"
>> snowshoes on the Three Sisters in the Rockies, on Mount Washington in New
>> Hampshire and on Mount Mitchell in North Carolina! In each case there was
>> over 6 feet of loose powder *on the trail*. If the Atlas snowshoes won't
>> stay afloat, the plastic ones definitely won't.
>>
>> Lee I Joe
>>
>> On Wed, 2010-12-22 at 15:20 -0500, Frank Looper wrote:
>>
>> I need a recommendation for snowshoes. Light and cheap would be nice, but
>> built-in crampons or similar and the ability to handle powder is more so.
>>
>> Alps? Ajax? MSR? I have no idea.
>>
>> Thanks!
>> InsaneLunaticWalker
>>
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