[at-l] Chili

Jim Bullard jim.bullard at gmail.com
Thu Jun 17 08:31:54 CDT 2010


I talk about "filling out" forms and I am not a Southerner so I think your
co-worker is an intransitive liar. :-)

Jim Bullard
http://jims-ramblings.blogspot.com/
http://members.photoportfolios.net/Jim_Bullard
http://jim-bullard.photoshelter.com/
http://picasaweb.google.com/jim.bullard


On Thu, Jun 17, 2010 at 9:04 AM, Nina Rogers
<Nina.Rogers at drakesoftware.com>wrote:

>  To say the café lady set an egg salad sandwich down is correct. “Set”
> means “to put in a certain place.” It’s usually a transitive verb, which
> means it takes a direct object. So you can set your pack on the ground, set
> your ferret on the top rack of the refrigerator, set your pants on fire,
> etc. Oh, wait, that last example doesn’t quite work …
>
>
>
> Sit means “to be seated” and is pretty much always intransitive unless
> you’re talking about Dottie, who (baby)sits my daughter for a living. In
> most cases, “sit” has no direct object. So sit down, Hopeful. Don’t sit
> here; sit there. Sit, Ubu, sit.
>
>
>
> “Lie” is kind of like “sit” in that it’s usually an intransitive verb and
> involves moving your body to a different position. “Let’s all lie down with
> Felix, close our eyes, and listen to the whippoorwills.” Of course, “lie”
> means something different in the biblical sense and when followed by the
> preposition “with.” We wouldn’t all want to lie **with** Felix, at least
> not all at once.
>
>
>
> “Lay” is transitive and is like “set” because it means “to place something
> down.” So you could lay your pack on the ground if you’re not happy with
> setting it there.
>
>
>
> What’s confusing is that “lay” is also the past tense of “lie.” If you lie
> on a mountaintop for your first hiking break at 10 a.m. and then tell
> someone about it six hours later, you would use the past tense: “I got to
> that mountaintop at 10 a.m. and lay down for a nap.”
>
>
>
> Of course, if you told an untruth on that mountaintop that morning, then
> you’d say you lied. Then you’d be a liar.
>
>
>
> I’m speaking North Carolina more and more. The other day I wrote that you
> need to fill out a form completely before submitting it, and some Yankee
> co-worker told me that my use of “fill out” was distinctly southern. Next
> thing I know, they’re going to tell me I can’t write “y’all” anymore. Hmph.
>
>
>
> *Waterfall*
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> at-l mailing list
> at-l at backcountry.net
> http://mailman.backcountry.net/mailman/listinfo/at-l
>
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://patsy.hack.net/pipermail/at-l/attachments/20100617/bc1b2711/attachment.html 


More information about the at-l mailing list