Yes, there are some who hike without a GPS.  I DID NOT CARRY A GPS - it seemed too heavy, too expensive, and too fallible. <div><br></div><div>But when I was hiking on the CDT with people who did have a GPS, it was sure handy to use it in a few situations.  </div>
<div><br></div><div>Bottom line: The CDT will remain poorly marked for many more years.  Everyone hiking the CDT needs to carry topo maps, a compass, and the knowledge of how to use them.  GPS is an optional supplement for those who are uncomfortable with their map reading skills, or the idea of losing the trail.</div>
<div><div><br></div><div>Honestly, you will get lost either way.  And that&#39;s part of the experience.  Good luck,</div><div><br></div><div>Dylan Carlson</div><div>Nobo CDT 2009</div><div><br></div><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; border-collapse: collapse; ">------------------------------<br>
<br>Message: 3<br>Date: Sat, 12 Dec 2009 05:46:20 -0800 (PST)<br>From: Michael Donnay &lt;<a href="mailto:mdonnay@yahoo.com" style="color: rgb(7, 77, 143); ">mdonnay@yahoo.com</a>&gt;<br>Subject: [Cdt-l] GPS and Maps<br><br>
I appreciate the rich discussion and helpful advice regarding GPS.? I have never owned or navigated with one of these devices (let alone even tried one in a store), but I&#39;m sure they are amazing technological breakthroughs.<br>
<br>I hiked the AT and PCT with only map and compass.? I never believed in resting my life on something that operates on batteries.? Many GPS users agree, and so they also carry map and compass.? I&#39;d rather save the weight and just rely on the map and compass and knowledge and skill to use them proficiently.? I&#39;ll be hiking the CDT next and am wondering if there are any CDT hikers out there without GPS and who rely only on map and compass.<br>
<br>Thanks,<br>Tall Glass<br></span></div></div>