<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=US-ASCII" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 8.00.6001.18854"></HEAD>
<BODY style="FONT-FAMILY: Arial; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 10pt" id=role_body  bottomMargin=7 leftMargin=7 rightMargin=7 topMargin=7><FONT id=role_document  color=#000000 size=2 face=Arial>
<DIV>I'm 5ft 6 inches and 60 -61 when I did the CDT in 2008-2009.&nbsp; For the 
Gila, I wore sturdy tennis shoes and kept them on&nbsp;all day since I was 
crossing the river constantly.&nbsp;&nbsp; Heavy, but safe.&nbsp; I noticed many 
hikers used&nbsp;crocs for the water.&nbsp; When I finished in 2009 (Lincoln, 
Montana to Canada) I used crocs.&nbsp; They worked like a charm.&nbsp; Hiked a 
bit in them in parts of the Bob Marshall where there were river crossings within 
several hundred yards.&nbsp; Normally I hike in hiking boots since my feet and 
ankles are crappy.&nbsp; Many,&nbsp;many hikers use some sort of trail shoe and 
keep them on for rivers&nbsp;and trail.&nbsp; Of course Billy Goat is famous for 
crossing rivers by wearing socks lined by his liners.&nbsp; If it's a nice sandy 
river bottom bare feet are ok too.</DIV>
<DIV>I am a fisherman and learned early on that when the water is swift - turn 
and face the current.&nbsp; Shuffle sideways across the water.&nbsp; Feels and 
sounds strange, but you are less likely to be swept off your feet.&nbsp; With 
two poles and two feet, keep 3 planted while you move the fourth.&nbsp; Slow, 
but safe for this timid old hiker.&nbsp; Take your time and "read" the 
river.&nbsp; What looks like a good crossing may or may not be. </DIV>
<DIV>Maybe I just hit it right, but I found fewer scary crossings on the CDT 
than I did on the PCT.&nbsp; In hiking season, most rivers in Glacier have nice 
suspension bridges across them!</DIV>
<DIV>CicelyB</DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>