<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 10pt;
font-family:Verdana
}
--></style>
</head>
<body class='hmmessage'>
Bob - <BR>
I didn't/don't see any need for your apology.&nbsp; Nor did I read that as a "lecture".&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Unless one is a trail maintainer FOR THAT PARTICULAR SECTION OF TRAIL, kicking down <BR>
cairns is simply rude, crude and inconsiderate.&nbsp; And carries a high probability of being <BR>
dangerous to those who follow.&nbsp; As you pointed out, the kicker would have <BR>
no idea of the purpose of those cairns.&nbsp; Now would&nbsp;they have any idea of the damage <BR>
that taking them down can do.&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Many of the cairns on the CDT are not there for hikers, but for skiers.&nbsp; As such, <BR>
they're built tall enough to be visible when the snowpack is&nbsp;five or six&nbsp;feet deep. Other<BR>
cairns are built in places where there is no treadway - or where the trail makes unexpected <BR>
turns or where the trail crosses large meadow areas.&nbsp; In the Winds,&nbsp;some of the trails are <BR>
marked ONLY by cairns - and taking them down means that&nbsp;only those familiar with the <BR>
trail&nbsp;can find, much less follow, the trail.&nbsp; Then there&nbsp; are the cairns that mark a water source.&nbsp;<BR>
I can think of a couple of small springs that are nearly invisible -&nbsp;but a small duck next to the<BR>
trail lets you know where to look for water. They've saved the day a time or two.&nbsp;<BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
The cairns on the CDT are rarely built by hikers - or casual passersby - or even horsemen.&nbsp; <BR>
They're generally built with taxpayer money by professional crews working for the Forest <BR>
Service BLM or one of the trail organizations.&nbsp; Which means that a lot of time, money and <BR>
effort have been put into building many of them.&nbsp; Which also means that taking them down <BR>
is vandalism and potentially legally actionable.&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Are there cairns that are misleading or misplaced?&nbsp; Damn right.&nbsp; But none of us here - including <BR>
Jack - are qualified to make that decision without a lot more knowledge that we have as hikers.&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
I've several times been on the trail in whiteout conditions where the ony indication of trail <BR>
was the cairns - and at least once I suspect I've followed Jack or one of his cairn-kicking <BR>
brethren.&nbsp; It cost me a LOT of time and a LOT of aggravation, and under different circumstances <BR>
could have cost lives.&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
So - if I find any kicked over cairns on the PCT this year, I'll&nbsp;be looking for Jack - and it <BR>
won't be to congratulate him.&nbsp; <BR>
&nbsp;<BR>
Jim<BR>
&nbsp; <BR><BR>http://www.spiriteaglehome.com/<BR><BR><BR>&nbsp;<BR>&gt; From: BobandShell97@verizon.net<BR>&gt; To: norcalhiker@gmail.com<BR>&gt; Date: Tue, 5 Jan 2010 10:30:14 -0500<BR>&gt; CC: cdt-l@backcountry.net<BR>&gt; Subject: Re: [Cdt-l] GPS and TOPO! ready files (based on Jonathan's Google, Earth file)<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Jack replied that I had "lectured" him... "again."<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; I apologize to him and to all of you if my plea for CDT cairns appeared to<BR>&gt; be a lecture. Not meant as such. <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; I spoke up only when he identified himself as "the guy that mapped the PCT<BR>&gt; for Backpacker Magazine" and I realized that he was the one who espoused<BR>&gt; kicking down cairns that didn't make sense to him, without knowing their<BR>&gt; purpose or history. That wasn't a "lecture" in the middle of the trail<BR>&gt; above Wrightwood, that was a flat-out argument between two gentleman who<BR>&gt; were frustrated that the other totally rejected the other's reasoning. I'm<BR>&gt; retired and my lecturing days are over, especially on a forum among<BR>&gt; respected equals like the CDT-L. I certainly apologize if my comment<BR>&gt; yesterday struck everyone as a lecture. I meant it as imploring him to view<BR>&gt; cairns on the CDT as potentially more important and beneficial than the ones<BR>&gt; he thought so unnecessary on the better-defined PCT that he had to kick them<BR>&gt; down. Actually, I'm begging him, and everyone, not to arbitrarily destroy<BR>&gt; CDT cairns or "ducks." I recall places on the CDT where a cairn drew my<BR>&gt; attention to a needed change of direction that I otherwise might have<BR>&gt; missed. After one pass in Colorado, my wife and I fanned out and searched<BR>&gt; for ANY sign of a trail. Way far to the left from where obvious trail had<BR>&gt; ended abruptly, I stumbled onto the tiniest of cairns - a mere 8" stack of<BR>&gt; small rocks in the grass - and that led to a gradually more apparent path.<BR>&gt; It would be nice if that little routefinding assistance would still be there<BR>&gt; for the next hiker who comes along. <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Someone posted, and I saved, the following admittedly "preachy" statement<BR>&gt; during a discussion of cairn destruction on another backpacking forum, many<BR>&gt; years ago: <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; "It's fascinating how we judge the value of things merely in relation to our<BR>&gt; own need. Cairns were put where they are for a reason. We may not<BR>&gt; understand "why" at the moment or where they lead, but nature rarely places<BR>&gt; one rock on top of another and there is a distinct purpose and aforethought<BR>&gt; in their construction. It can be fascinating to try to understand<BR>&gt; historically why the cairns are there. Discovering and following old trails<BR>&gt; can be a joy unto itself and sometimes leads to efforts to persuade the<BR>&gt; Forest Service to reopen trails long closed or abandoned. It is the Forest<BR>&gt; Service, after all, that has legal authority over most of our public<BR>&gt; recreation lands and it requires a certain arrogance to assume that we know<BR>&gt; best and that we should step in and destroy cairns or markers that someone<BR>&gt; else has previously deemed important or necessary. What may seem frivolous,<BR>&gt; unnecessary, or marring of the landscape to one may indeed be incredibly<BR>&gt; important to that someone who carefully placed the cairns in the first<BR>&gt; place. No one can expect you to know all there is about the situation<BR>&gt; before you... and you shouldn't assume that you do either and just destroy<BR>&gt; cairns, the purpose of which you might have, at present, no clue." <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Anyway, I again apologize if my original comments on cairns offended. OK,<BR>&gt; I've made my plea about CDT cairns and I'm outta here...<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Dr Bob<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; -----Original Message-----<BR>&gt; From: cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net [mailto:cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net]<BR>&gt; On Behalf Of Bob<BR>&gt; Sent: Monday, January 04, 2010 9:44 PM<BR>&gt; To: 'Jack Haskel'; 'Brett'<BR>&gt; Cc: 'CDT'<BR>&gt; Subject: Re: [Cdt-l] GPS and TOPO! ready files (based on Jonathan's Google,<BR>&gt; Earth file)<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Jack, <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; On the CDT, please don't kick down cairns the way you were so proud of doing<BR>&gt; on the PCT. There are many places where they are important on this<BR>&gt; lesser-marked trail. They sure helped me in a number of places on the CDT.<BR>&gt; I know you've said that you feel GPS technology should be utilized by all<BR>&gt; hikers, but please leave any CDT cairns standing, for those of us who like a<BR>&gt; nice visual confirmation on the ground once in a while. <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Dr Bob<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; -----Original Message-----<BR>&gt; From: cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net [mailto:cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net]<BR>&gt; On Behalf Of Jack Haskel<BR>&gt; Sent: Monday, January 04, 2010 7:24 PM<BR>&gt; To: Brett<BR>&gt; Cc: CDT<BR>&gt; Subject: Re: [Cdt-l] GPS and TOPO! ready files (based on Jonathan's Google,<BR>&gt; Earth file)<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; "Frankly it'd be a lot easier to generate a reasonably accurate and<BR>&gt; comprehensive "GIS" of the CDT by referring to existing resources (maps,<BR>&gt; guidebook descriptions) and hand drawing a data set using Google Earth or<BR>&gt; TOPO!"<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Heck yeah it'd be easier! I'm pretty sure that actually hiking the CDT would<BR>&gt; be kind of... hard.... :)<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; I'm the guy that mapped the PCT for Backpacker Magazine (backpacker.com/pct)<BR>&gt; so I'm one of the few that's collected a detailed track log and way point<BR>&gt; set for a long trail. Too bad that very few use the PCT data (and too bad<BR>&gt; that it was post processed in a less than useful way). The CDT project by<BR>&gt; the magazine is incomplete. They tried to have a bunch of teams of people<BR>&gt; map it, and it was never finished. Maybe I'll do my thing for the CDT? I'm<BR>&gt; not excited about the prospect and don't have the funds for the hundreds of<BR>&gt; dollars worth of lithium batteries. I took a bread crumb every 0.03 of a<BR>&gt; mile I think, and took a waypoint of a road, watersource, campsite,<BR>&gt; viewpoint, etc on average every mile. <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Cheers,<BR>&gt; Jack<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; On Jan 4, 2010, at 6:12 PM, Brett wrote:<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; &gt; Order's<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; _______________________________________________<BR>&gt; Cdt-l mailing list<BR>&gt; Cdt-l@backcountry.net<BR>&gt; http://mailman.backcountry.net/mailman/listinfo/cdt-l<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; _______________________________________________<BR>&gt; Cdt-l mailing list<BR>&gt; Cdt-l@backcountry.net<BR>&gt; http://mailman.backcountry.net/mailman/listinfo/cdt-l<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; _______________________________________________<BR>&gt; Cdt-l mailing list<BR>&gt; Cdt-l@backcountry.net<BR>&gt; http://mailman.backcountry.net/mailman/listinfo/cdt-l<BR>                                               </body>
</html>