<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:times new roman, new york, times, serif;font-size:12pt"><DIV>I just gotta chime in here on this subject.&nbsp; Everybody has got to hike their own hike, especially&nbsp;when it comes to footwear on one of these long trails...&nbsp; Myself,&nbsp; I have never considered wearing heavier footwear then a good solid pair of trail runners with appropriate&nbsp;arch support inserts. I just slog thru what ever water obstacle happens across my path and rarely&nbsp;even stop to empty out the&nbsp;shoes on the other side.&nbsp; It's not a big deal, really. Especially&nbsp;after one is trail hardened, which I think is the key to this.&nbsp; &nbsp;Once a&nbsp;thru-hiker has his/her gear down to a reasonable weight&nbsp;the need for heavy boots and the &nbsp;extra sandals or whatever&nbsp;you will need to put on to keep those boots from
 getting&nbsp;submerged&nbsp;goes out the window...&nbsp; &nbsp;The trade off for cold/wet feet, especially on the CDT, is&nbsp;always an extra incentive to keep moving. Which is not a bad thing on one of these buggers if you want to finish.&nbsp;&nbsp;chris&nbsp;knight &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;PCT 01&nbsp;/ AT 06&nbsp;/ CDT O8<BR></DIV>
<DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif"><BR>
<DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: times new roman, new york, times, serif"><FONT face=Tahoma size=2>
<HR SIZE=1>
<B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">From:</SPAN></B> RICHARD OSTHEIMER &lt;rick.ostheimer@sbcglobal.net&gt;<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">To:</SPAN></B> cdt-l@backcountry.net<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Sent:</SPAN></B> Tue, January 19, 2010 6:45:15 PM<BR><B><SPAN style="FONT-WEIGHT: bold">Subject:</SPAN></B> [Cdt-l] Wet foot/Cold Foot - Footwear Choice<BR></FONT><BR>
<DIV style="FONT-SIZE: 12pt; FONT-FAMILY: arial, helvetica, sans-serif">I'm with MtnEd on this one.&nbsp; I wore my LaSportiva Makalu's on both the AT and PCT.&nbsp; Yep, they're heavy compared to trail runners, but at the end of a 25 or 30 mile day coming out of town with 30 lbs, my feet aren't sore.&nbsp; On the PCT, I tried a section north of Ashland, OR using trail runners, Montrail Hardrocks.&nbsp; These were well broken in.&nbsp; After the initial bout of blisters that kept me down to 7 miles the day out of Crater Lake, I started noticing that my mileage fell off and that my feet were sore after about 22 or so miles.&nbsp; The blister issue with the Hardrocks was much worse than I had starting out on either the AT or PCT with the Makalu's.&nbsp; Plead, successfuly, with the post(master/mistress) at Cascade Locks to forward my bounce bucket back to Sisters and switched back to my boots.&nbsp; What a relief!<BR><BR>However, for this year's CDT, I'm
 still planning to give the trail runners another try for the Gila River section.&nbsp; Who know's, I might just become a convert.&nbsp; I just can't see stopping at every river crossing to doff the boots and put on the Crocs.&nbsp; When wearing boots, I make an effort to keep stream water from overflowing into them as well as to prevent rain water from running down my legs and filling them up.&nbsp; If the ford looks over the top of the boots, I stop and switch to Crocs held in place with a length of bear back line.&nbsp; Although my boots don't have goretex and aren't waterproof, once they are wet, they do take a lo-o-ong time to dry, and while they are wet, they weigh several extra pounds each.<BR><BR>One other point, although the boots have an expensive price tag, overall they're more economical.&nbsp; My LaSportiva's did all of the PCT except the Ashland-Sisters section and, after a visit to Dave, The Cobbler in Seattle are still going
 strong.<BR><BR>Handlebar<BR>AT06, PCT08<BR></DIV></DIV></DIV><!-- cg24.c3.mail.sp2.yahoo.com compressed/chunked Wed Jan 20 08:30:20 PST 2010 --></div><br>



      </body></html>