<html xmlns:v="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:vml" xmlns:o="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" xmlns:w="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:word" xmlns:m="http://schemas.microsoft.com/office/2004/12/omml" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-html40"><head><meta http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=utf-8"><meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 12 (filtered medium)"><style><!--
/* Font Definitions */
@font-face
        {font-family:"Cambria Math";
        panose-1:2 4 5 3 5 4 6 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Calibri;
        panose-1:2 15 5 2 2 2 4 3 2 4;}
@font-face
        {font-family:Tahoma;
        panose-1:2 11 6 4 3 5 4 4 2 4;}
/* Style Definitions */
p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        color:purple;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p.MsoAcetate, li.MsoAcetate, div.MsoAcetate
        {mso-style-priority:99;
        mso-style-link:"Balloon Text Char";
        margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:8.0pt;
        font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif";}
span.EmailStyle17
        {mso-style-type:personal;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:#0D0D0D;}
span.BalloonTextChar
        {mso-style-name:"Balloon Text Char";
        mso-style-priority:99;
        mso-style-link:"Balloon Text";
        font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif";}
span.EmailStyle20
        {mso-style-type:personal-reply;
        font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";
        color:#0D0D0D;}
.MsoChpDefault
        {mso-style-type:export-only;
        font-size:10.0pt;}
@page WordSection1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.0in 1.0in 1.0in;}
div.WordSection1
        {page:WordSection1;}
--></style><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapedefaults v:ext="edit" spidmax="1026" />
</xml><![endif]--><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml>
<o:shapelayout v:ext="edit">
<o:idmap v:ext="edit" data="1" />
</o:shapelayout></xml><![endif]--></head><body lang=EN-US link=blue vlink=purple><div class=WordSection1><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>Thanks – I never really understood what WAAS means.   <o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>+1 on UTM.  I really liked using the UTM gridded maps.  Once you figure it out, it’s easy.   <o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><div><div style='border:none;border-top:solid #B5C4DF 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 0in 0in 0in'><p class=MsoNormal><b><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif"'>From:</span></b><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif"'> cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net [mailto:cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net] <b>On Behalf Of </b>bcss@bresnan.net<br><b>Sent:</b> Sunday, April 14, 2013 10:20 AM<br><b>To:</b> 'Sage Clegg'; cdt-l@backcountry.net<br><b>Subject:</b> [Cdt-l] GPS 101<o:p></o:p></span></p></div></div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>GPS satellites send out radio signals which travel at speeds approaching the speed of light. The distance from the GPS to a satellite is calculated by measuring the amount of &nbsp;time it takes for a signal to travel the 12,000+ miles to earth and multiplying that times the speed of light. By determining distances to multiple satellites in view, &nbsp;the relative position of the GPS on the ground can thereby be determined.&nbsp; &nbsp;The accuracy of that position is affected by atmospheric drag, weather events, etc. which all tend to slow down the signals.&nbsp; The atmospheric effects are overcome in the professional GPS world by having another GPS running nearby and stationary at a known location.&nbsp; &nbsp;The positional errors caused by the atmosphere can be determined in this manner and applied to the GPS which is roving around, making that position more accurate.&nbsp; <o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>The quality of the GPS hardware affects the results. &nbsp;Industry grade units have more precise clocks and bigger, better antennas which improve accuracy. The units used in the Mapping project are rated sub-meter, meaning that in a perfect world you can turn one on and locate yourself to that precision. <o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>Most of the newer GPS receivers have a feature called WAAS. (Wide Area Augmentation System)&nbsp; This was developed for air traffic, but has great value for all users.&nbsp; WAAS enabled GPS receivers are receiving correction data from a nationwide network of continuously operating ground stations via broadcasts from other satellites. &nbsp;It works very well.&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>GPS receivers (like the Etrex 20 and 30) also can be configured to use GLONASS.&nbsp; GLONASS is the Russian GPS system.&nbsp; By using both US and Russian satellites simultaneously it is possible to get results in places where GPS didn’t used to work at all.&nbsp; (Like rough terrain and under tree cover)&nbsp; Unfortunately, the Etrex units have a tiny antenna and can’t be hooked to a external antenna so they aren’t as good as they could be. &nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>Sage - Recreational GPS receivers are generally not of high enough quality to define better than a 5-10 meter sized spot.&nbsp; Getting a 5 meter disagreement between two such receivers is not unusual, especially if they are not the same exact make and model. &nbsp;Differences in the clocks and antennas might explain the discrepancy. &nbsp;&nbsp;Having WAAS turned on for one and not the other could account for differences. &nbsp;An external antenna which is mounted above head height is preferable – the head and body of the user can block multiple satellites. &nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>I am with you in preferring UTM to geographic (lat/long) coordinates because of the ease of locating a point or finding yourself on a map.&nbsp; The native language of GPS is WGS84 geographic, however.&nbsp; When a GPS displays a UTM position it is converting it via software. NAD83 is the United State’s localized implementation of WGS84 and the two currently differ by about a meter.&nbsp; Mixing those up would not be as critical as if you did it with NAD27. &nbsp;Most of the USGS topo maps are NAD27 because they were produced prior to 1984. &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><div><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>best wishes,<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'>Jerry Brown<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><a href="mailto:bcss@bresnan.net">mailto:bcss@bresnan.net</a><o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><a href="www.bearcreeksurvey.com">www.bearcreeksurvey.com</a><o:p></o:p></span></p></div><p class=MsoNormal><span style='font-size:11.0pt;font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif";color:#0D0D0D'><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><div><div style='border:none;border-top:solid #B5C4DF 1.0pt;padding:3.0pt 0in 0in 0in'><p class=MsoNormal><b><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif"'>From:</span></b><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:"Tahoma","sans-serif"'> <a href="mailto:cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net">cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net</a> [<a href="mailto:cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net">mailto:cdt-l-bounces@backcountry.net</a>] <b>On Behalf Of </b>Sage Clegg<br><b>Sent:</b> Saturday, April 13, 2013 8:15 PM<br><b>To:</b> <a href="mailto:cdt-l@backcountry.net">cdt-l@backcountry.net</a><br><b>Subject:</b> Re: [Cdt-l] Cdt-l Digest, Vol 67, Issue 15<o:p></o:p></span></p></div></div><p class=MsoNormal><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></p><blockquote style='margin-top:5.0pt;margin-bottom:5.0pt'><p class=MsoNormal><br><span style='color:black'>Howdy folks!</span><o:p></o:p></p></blockquote><p class=MsoNormal>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;I just wanted to throw out a big thanks to all of you GPS Geeks (I mean that in the most endearing way possible) for finally explaining why a datum setting in my GPS might matter. I never hike with a GPS (I will be this summer on the Oregon Desert Trail though..), but I take data on my unit everyday as a tortoise biologist. I always wondered what the consequence was if I was using a different datum than someone else, now I know! 100' is a big deal when I'm collecting data!<o:p></o:p></p><div><p class=MsoNormal>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Another GPS issue I have been encountering lately is that my gps is consistently about 5 meters off of my co-worker's. We are both using the same datum (NAD83). We have changed batteries, turned them off and on, I even cursed mine and then ignored it (it sometimes works, I swear!)&nbsp;Any thoughts on how to &quot;re-calibrate&quot; a GPS? Might it be broken?<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Another question I have is about UTM's vs Lat/Long. As a biologist I have always used UTM's, but the current project I am on is using Lat/Long. Maybe it's just because I don't like dealing with all the extra digits of lat/long, but I haven't warmed up to using them. Do any of you use lat/long? Why? Does anyone have any tips for a simple way to make the switch from my UTM focused universe to a jumble of degrees, minutes, seconds, and decimal places?<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Thanks, and I hope the wind storms that keep spitting dust in my eyes here in the Mojave aren't slamming those NOBO hikers right now. If they are I highly recommend getting some ski goggles!!!<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;Happy trails!<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>Sage<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>&nbsp;&nbsp;<o:p></o:p></p></div><div><p class=MsoNormal>&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;<o:p></o:p></p></div></div></body></html>